Information Overload! ‘Misinfodemics’ and the role of media

Are you ever confronted with so much information, or so many options that your ability to process stops working and you become anxious?

Yeah me to. Living inside my head can be quite difficult at times. This shows in numerous ways, yet there are 3 illustrative examples.

I can’t deal with multiple commands at the same time.

If I’m in a noisy room for too long I tend to retreat to seclusion.

I get nervous about Cash Machine withdraws, so I (often) stick to a routine amount, which lends a comforting sense of structure.

Everybody suffers with information overload. Some autistic people suffer with overload more, yet all our brains are receptive to simple, easy to comprehend info, that establishes a brand and sets a great story.

Stories

There’s a link to be drawn between the way people like me awkwardly digest information, and campaigns. Politicians and brands use catchy three word slogans ’cause they know you will remember and understand them.

It’s the same with ‘fake news’. They serve the function of boiling down complex subjects like coronavirus, to fictional or at least incomplete titbits of information.

‘Speed and information overload – the internet allows what is posted to spread at the speed of light, before anyone can check it. By the time one scam or lie has been investigated many others have taken its place’

ELA area, public library

We are seeing a process where more information is available, yet is increasingly condensed. Rather than two people giving us separate commands, hundreds are. This in itself creates an ‘overload’ where it can become anxiety inducing to find a complete picture of the full truth.

‘Misinfodemics’

Misinfodemic’ (Noun): The spread of a health outcome facilitated by viral misinformation

Posters as part of an Ebola Health Campaign in the Congo

Having an overload of information understandably leads to people seeking simple answers which often provide an oversimplification, peddle an agenda, or are just false.

According to WHO Director Ghebreyesus, with Covid-19 ‘we are not just fighting an epidemic; we are fighting an infodemic’

This is not a new idea. Eerily basic answers to complex problems have shown throughout history.

Anti-Vaccine: In 2019 England’s NHS chief executive blamed anti-vaxx content for their falling uptake. This points to how complicated concerns around child safety can be exploited to promote dangerous theories like ‘vaccines cause autism’ (An idea my existence finds particularly absurd).

Ebola ‘fake news‘: Violence associated with politics, in democratic republic of Congo, aided narratives about the US creating Ebola, leading to armed attacks against treatment centers. This provides a dangerously inane answer to the problem of disease, linking politics with confusion about the disease.

A Soviet Propaganda poster about HIV/Aids

‘Misinfodemics’ in the Soviet Union: Soviet propaganda in the 1980s claimed that the US was responsible for the spread of HIV in Africa. This is another example of public information being weaponized to play into pre-established ideologies, while producing an emotional response to the threat.

We are not immune to this effect. When someone claims that ‘5G frequencies carry the coronavirus’ that’s being based off confusion about the causes of coronavirus, distrust of authority, and linking two consecutive stories together.

“disease also spreads when people cluster in digital spaces. We know that memes…spread like viruses: mutating rapidly until one idea finds an optimal form and spreads quickly. What we have yet to develop are effective ways to identify, test, and vaccinate against these misinfo-memes”

Gynes and Mina, The Atlantic (2018)

Much of the efforts to combat these types of stories have focussed on ‘debunking’ . While this has its place, its not particularly helpful. Online experiments in Brazil found that providing corrective did not lessen common misconceptions about Zika, and reduced levels of confidence in all information about the virus.

Without a rethink of how media platforms present information, our crowded media environment will always result in an ‘overload’ effect where the lack of ability to comprehend numerous ‘goings on’ in our busy room, will lead us to the seclusion of stories that provide dangerously easy-to-understand answers.

An Atypical Perspective…

Being shouted multiple commands at once is unhelpful: consuming the news is stressful. The dramatic reporting is overwhelming – heightening worry which is easy to exploit by those shouting ‘foreign virus’ or ‘conspiracy’. Different outlets all having perspectives, also creates an air of mistrust. While dramatics have their place, the task of news media could be reassuring and explaining.

Our media spaces could be less busy and noisy: We have a duty to seek out reliable info. Yet, the difficulty in seeking it is absurd. Making media spaces seem less noisy could be a matter of digital and traditional outlets prioritizing expert analysis and ‘explainer’ material, where people can seclude themselves to get a full picture. This must rely on authorities like government providing trustworthy, simple info.

Routine as a manner of coping: Much like me with cash machines I often stick to a set amount as it allows me to retain a sense of certainty and structure. How much news do you need to consume to find out all that you need to know? set an hour aside every day to find out the facts, then turn your computer off. Outlets obviously have a role by making understandable info accessible.

By implementing some of these methods we would also be doing a favour to some autistic people as well who suffer with uncertainty and ‘overload’.

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